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Lent Devotional: Rembrandt’s Storm On The Sea Of Galilee

This Lent Devotional is focused on the Storm on the Sea of Galilee,  and can serve as a vehicle for many to experience an inspiring portion of Scripture and to sense the voice of God. The masterpieces we will examine in this series are incredible expressions of spiritual truth. (If you wish to read the devotional just click on red title.)

Stolen on March 18, 1990, this painting was one of 13 taken in one of the largest art thefts in history. Posing as police officers, the thieves broke into the Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum in Boston and stole 13 works. The paintings are still missing and the empty frames hang in their original locations in the library, a sad reminder and testament to the loss.

Another interesting note is that Rembrandt’s signature is on the rudder of the ship. If you are sharing this painting with children, a search for the signature can be a fun way to encourage close observations.

If you enjoy this work you can check out my blog post on Rembrandt’s, Dream of Saint Joseph. 

Rembrandt's Storm on The Sea of Galilee

If you are interested in Art as it relates to your devotional activities I have a ton of material available to you:

Visit my Shop for an extensive 20 part Video and Print series focusing on the passion week and designed to be used during Lent.

This devotional on Raphael’s Transfiguration is a part of a larger series I did for my church and includes activities for adults and kids. Here are the others in the Series:

Lent Devotional: Raphael’s Transfiguration

Lent Devotional: Duccio’s, Temptation of Christ

Lent Devotional: Assereto’s Christ Healing the Blind Man

I also have multiple blog posts on Advent in Art Themes.

Finally, I want to invite you to become a part of a group of generous people who love what I am doing and want to see me continue and expand my work. You can join that team by following the button in the sidebar to my Patreon page and becoming a Patron. Thanks!

 

 

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Kellybagdanov.com is a rich source for educators who are interested in integrating Art History into their teaching model. You can find Art History Curriculum and Resources for teaching here.

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