Hate history?

  Do you hate History? Did you watch the clock tick off each minute as your teacher droned on? Did you suffer through dry readings, memorize meaningless dates, and answer pointless review questions? Do you dread subjecting your child to the same boring process? If so, I’m sorry. Believe me, it doesn’t have to be […] Read More

Why We Need to Rethink Rewards

Do you have some sort of reward system in place for chores?  Do you reward yourself when you lose a certain amount of weight or work out every day for a week? Do you pay your kids for good grades, or take them for ice cream if they read a certain number of books? When […] Read More

Elementary Curriculum Recommendations

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These are many wonderful curriculums out there, so this list just shows the tip of the iceberg. While the variety of choices is great, it is also OVERWHELMING. If you just need a place to start, I’d recommend these. Then as you get more comfortable with homeschooling you can branch out. To start with, cover […] Read More

Frames and Pedestals, They Matter!

Our first impression of a piece of art is greatly influenced by how the work is displayed and by what surrounds it. Making the effort to consciously take note of these elements can increase our ability to read a work correctly. A closer look at a few sculptures will illustrate just what I mean. Before […] Read More

Botticelli’s Venus and Mars

Happy Late Valentine’s Day! Botticelli’s portrayal of Venus and Mars is both beautiful and humorous. Mischievous satyrs, clear bright colors, hidden symbols, and missing legs all deserve a closer look so let’s get started.  Botticelli’s paintings of mythological stories are among his most famous. This work is telling the story of the illicit love affair […] Read More

Vision After the Sermon

This is Paul Gauguin’s painting called Vision After the Sermon.  Gauguin was a post-impressionist French painter who painted this work in 1888. Heavily influenced by Japanese print making and primitive art, Gauguin felt European art lacked the substance and symbolism found in primitive cultures. He often spoke of himself as a ‘savage’ and claimed that […] Read More

The Grand Tour

For nearly 300 years there was a tradition among the aristocracy of Europe to take a Grand Tour of prominent cities and their holdings of art in young adulthood. As I’m developing an Art History Curriculum, I’ve been excited to share the shape and scope of what I am working on. Art is a wonderful visual […] Read More

Let a Child Lead You

Color in art is…complicated. While working on writing a clear, somewhat comprehensive article on the subject for my curriculum, I’ve struggled far more than seems reasonable. Connected to my thoughts on color, in a round about way, is another topic I’m interested in: teaching art to children. Color in art can be realistic, symbolic, emotive, […] Read More