Peter Paul Rubens – Was the Old Master a Spy?

The Consequences of War, (or sometimes The Horrors of War) is an impressive painting by Peter Paul Rubens. The work was painted in response to the Thirty Years’ War and is heavily allegorical. Using mythological iconography to convey an eloquent warning, Rubens gives us a painting of disturbing beauty. The message of ‘The Consequences of […] Read More

Frames and Pedestals, They Matter!

Our first impression of a piece of art is greatly influenced by how the work is displayed and by what surrounds it. Making the effort to consciously take note of these elements can increase our ability to read a work correctly. A closer look at a few sculptures will illustrate just what I mean. Before […] Read More

Vision After the Sermon

This is Paul Gauguin’s painting called Vision After the Sermon.  Gauguin was a post-impressionist French painter who painted this work in 1888. Heavily influenced by Japanese print making and primitive art, Gauguin felt European art lacked the substance and symbolism found in primitive cultures. He often spoke of himself as a ‘savage’ and claimed that […] Read More

Let a Child Lead You

Color in art is…complicated. While working on writing a clear, somewhat comprehensive article on the subject for my curriculum, I’ve struggled far more than seems reasonable. Connected to my thoughts on color, in a round about way, is another topic I’m interested in: teaching art to children. Color in art can be realistic, symbolic, emotive, […] Read More

Entering The Conversation That Is Art.

Every discipline has it’s tools. Writer’s craft with words to stimulate the senses, rouse the emotions, and spark our ideas. Construction workers use tools to make an architect’s drawings a physical reality. Teachers use books, imagination, and dialog to inspire their students to learn. When we want to know more about art, how to read […] Read More